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Published Stories

Freedom in Creative Expression: An Interview with Charmaine Olivia

(Published at San Clemente Lifestyle Magazine)

When you’re creating a piece and you think you aren’t going to show anyone, is that fear? Or is it just about wanting to do it for yourself? It’s both. I had just finished doing a big solo show I spent months preparing for, when I created “This is Mine”. After the show, to create something without a specific purpose felt good. I don’t even know why I kept painting. I just can’t stop sometimes. I have a day off and just keep making more art. But it was cleansing in a way, and freeing. There are stages of painting where the piece looks weird and it can be vulnerable to show my work to people when it’s not done. Sometimes it’s better to be alone and to be able to completely let go and not worry about what it’s going to look like because that’s not really the point. It’s easy to get caught up in what other people will think of the work, but at the end of the day, that’s not why I paint. I do it because I love it. It’s healing for me and I get to know myself through it...

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Exercise Your Creativity: A Fun Way to Improve Your Health

(Published at San Clemente Lifestyle Magazine, image courtesy Shutterstock)

Did you know that one way to take care of your health is to exercise your creativity? In the last 15 years, research has pointed to the health benefits of creativity. A leading magazine in psychology for 50 years, Psychology Today claims that creativity contributes to several health benefits, such as increased positive emotions, decreased symptoms of depression, reduced stress responses and sometimes, improvements in immune system functioning...

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The Groundbreaking Girls Project: How One Woman Found Strength and Healing Through Creativity

(Published at San Clemente Lifestyle Magazine)

At the beginning of 2017, Allison Adams no longer recognized the world. She had lost her husband, Vernon, or Vernon Version .02 as she calls him, two and a half years after he had been in a terrible accident. In May 2014, Vernon Version .01 was driving home on his Vespa in south San Clemente when he was hit by a truck. He went into a coma, where he stayed for three months, and never ended up going home again. He awoke from the coma with severe brain injury, broken bones and short-term memory loss. Allison, along with her two children, friends and family, spent her life during those two and a half years by Vernon’s side in the hospital...

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